SCREENING AND DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT

What We Screen, Assess and Evaluate?

We fully understand the challenges and frustrations young families, parents and young adults could be facing especially when a younger family member or individual encounters difficulties in learning and life progression. Resolving issues and differences could be tricky when knowledge and skills are limited. Most often, you may feel engulfed and devastated when all perceived avenues are exhausted and yet expected outcomes were poorly achieved.

Our science and evidence based services are designed to be holistic and systematic. You need not feel anguished and helpless. A well planned program is usually effective and empowering, restoring confidence in families. Below is the non-exhaustive list of assessments that our center provides:

Learning &

Behavioural 

Disorders

Screening

Learning & Behavioural Disorders (LBD) Screening refer to difficulties in acquiring academic skills in one or more areas despite normal intelligence and adequate opportunities for learning. Individuals with LBD may struggle with tasks such as executive functioning skills, reading comprehension, spelling, writing fluency, mathematical operations, and understanding mathematical concepts. 

LBD screening typically involves initial assessments to identify individuals who may be at risk for difficulties in academic areas. A few of the many tools include screening for learning disorders, disruptive behavioural disorders and sensory processing disorders etc. Screening helps in the early identification of potential learning and cognitive difficulties. By administering brief, targeted assessments, our educational therapists can pinpoint areas of concern and address them proactively. Early detection allows for timely intervention, improving the chances of successful intervention & therapy. Early detection allows the avoidance of negative self-perceptions. A supportive environment that focuses on individual needs fosters a positive attitude towards learning.

Psychoeducational

 Diagnostic

 Assessment

 Evaluation 

Profiling

Psychoeducational Diagnostic Assessment, Evaluation & Profiling (PDAEP) is a comprehensive process using various tools and instruments in determining your child’s learning abilities and behavioural profile (sensory, adaptive, cognitive, socio-emotional behavioural etc) in terms of how he or she could learn better, and the areas presenting as challenges to your child. Our Case Review Report (CRR) of the comprehensive PDAEP covers the block categories such as Hierarchical Abilities and Skills, Cattell-Horn-Carroll Model of Human Cognitive Abilities, Cross Battery Assessments, Cognitive Hypothesis Testing (CHT), Cognition-Conation-Affection-Sensation (CCAS) Model, Bronfenbrenner Ecological System and Triple-D Model  etc.

Our comprehensive PDAEP assesses the nosography of specific learning difficulties and disorders (falling within such as neurodevelopmental disorders, psychological disorders and other conditions) your child may have. The assessment report help many parents to better understand the profile of their child and make better informed decisions and support to be provided to their child. It can also help to unlock supports and special accommodations at school, college or university as required by your child. This makes the education process more meaningful for your child.

Addictive

Behaviour 

Assessment

Addictive Behaviours refer to patterns of behavior that become compulsive, difficult to control, and often lead to negative consequences. These behaviors typically involve repeated engagement in activities that provide pleasure or relief, despite the potential for harm. Its assessment is a critical step in understanding the complexities and its impact on an individual’s life, seeking to uncover triggers, cravings, and the reinforcing factors that contribute to addictive behaviors. These assessments utilise various tools, including self-report questionnaires, interviews, and behavioral observations. 

Understanding the intricate relationship between addiction and behavior is crucial for individualising effective treatment plans. It allows our clinicians to identify underlying psychological factors, co-occurring mental health issues, and social influences that contribute to addictive behaviors. The importance of such assessments extends to guiding interventions, whether through counseling or support groups. By gaining insights into the behavioral aspects of addiction, our counselors can design targeted strategies to address the root causes and equip individuals with the necessary tools for sustainable recovery. Additionally, ongoing addiction assessments are essential for monitoring progress, adapting treatment approaches, and promoting long-term recovery and well-being.

Affective 

Disorders 

Assessment

Affective disorders encompass a broad spectrum of conditions that impact mood, emotions, and overall emotional well-being. This category includes various disorders such as depression, bipolar disorder, and a range of anxiety disorders. Commonly utilised tools for evaluating these conditions include standardised questionnaires such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) for bipolar disorder, and the Generalised Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7) scale for anxiety disorders. Additionally, structured clinical interviews like the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-5 (SCID) are valuable for gaining detailed insights into symptoms, severity, and functional impairment. By employing these assessment approaches, clinicians can accurately diagnose affective disorders, tailor treatment plans, and monitor progress effectively, thus contributing to improved management and enhanced quality of life for individuals coping with these challenges.

Attention

Deficit

Hyperactive

Disorder

Assessment

Assessing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) involves a thorough evaluation of a person’s attention span, impulse control, and hyperactive behaviors. Clinicians and healthcare professionals employ various tools and methods to conduct comprehensive ADHD assessments. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) criteria serve as a foundation for diagnosis, outlining specific symptoms and their duration. The ADHD Rating Scale, available in different versions for children and adults, is a common tool that relies on self-reports or reports from caregivers and teachers to assess ADHD symptoms across different settings. Continuous Performance Tests (CPTs) like the Conners’ CPT are computer-based assessments designed to measure sustained attention and impulse control. Behavioral observations, structured interviews, and neuropsychological assessments may also be part of the evaluation process. The multifaceted nature of ADHD necessitates a holistic approach, combining input from various sources and utilising validated tools to ensure accurate and comprehensive assessments.

Autism

Spectrum

Disorder

Assessment

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a lifelong neurodevelopmental condition characterised by challenges with social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. It’s called a “spectrum” because the severity and symptoms can vary widely among individuals. Some may have significant difficulties in daily functioning, while others may have milder challenges. ASD cannot be “recovered” or cured in traditional sense. However, with early intervention and appropriate support, individuals with ASD can make significant progress in their social communication skills and overall functioning.

Assessment tools commonly used in evaluating ASD include the Gilliam Autism Rating Scale 3 (GARS-3) or Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS). Both of gold standards standardised observational tool that assesses social and communication behaviors, the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R), a structured interview conducted with caregivers to gather information about the individual’s developmental history and current behaviors, and various screening questionnaires such as the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT).

It’s important to understand that each person with ASD is unique, and interventions should be tailored to their specific needs and strengths to promote the best possible outcomes.and provide the necessary support to enhance the individual’s developmental outcomes and quality of life. 

Disruptive 

Behaviour 

Disorders 

Assessment

Disruptive behavior disorders, encompassing conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and intermittent explosive disorder, are assessed through a variety of tools designed to identify symptoms and assess their severity. Commonly used assessment instruments include the Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale (DBDRS), the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD). These tools typically involve gathering information from multiple sources, such as parents, teachers, and the individual themselves, to provide a comprehensive understanding of the disruptive behaviors exhibited. Through our systematic assessment using these tools, our educational therapists can accurately identify the presence of disruptive behavior disorders and tailor interventions to address the specific needs of the individual, promoting positive behavioral outcomes and improving overall functioning.

Mathematics

Learning

Disabilities 

Assessment

Mathematics Learning Disabilities (MLD) is a learning disorder that affects a person’s ability to understand and work with numbers. Individuals with MLD may have difficulty with basic arithmetic operations, number sense, and understanding mathematical concepts. This can impact their academic performance in math-related subjects and everyday tasks involving numbers.

Assessment for MLD involves employing a range of available tools designed to assess mathematical abilities and identify potential indicators of the disorder. These tools include the Dyscalculia Screener, the TEMA-3 (Test of Early Mathematics Ability), and the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement. Our assessments evaluate various aspects of mathematical skills, including number sense, arithmetic fluency, and mathematical reasoning. By utilising these tools, our educational therapists can accurately identify individuals who may be at risk for MLD and provide targeted interventions and support to help them overcome challenges in mathematics and succeed academically.

Dyslexia 

Hyperlexia 

Assessment

Dyslexia is a learning disorder that affects reading ability. Individuals with dyslexia may have difficulty with reading, spelling, and decoding words due to challenges in processing language. Dyslexia assessment instruments often evaluate reading accuracy, fluency, comprehension, and phonological processing skills. Common assessing tools for dyslexia include the Dyslexia Screening Test and the Phonological Awareness Screening Test

Hyperlexia, on the other hand, is a condition where children have a precocious ability to read at an early age, often before the age of five, but may have difficulty with comprehension or other aspects of language development. Hyperlexia assessment involves tests such as  Hyperlexia Screening Questionnaire assess reading abilities beyond what is expected for the individual’s age, accompanied by challenges in comprehension or language development.

Neurodevelopmental

Disorder

Assessment

Neurodevelopmental disorder assessments are vital tools in understanding and evaluating the complex interplay of cognitive, motor, language, and socio-emotional development in individuals, particularly children. These assessments are essential for identifying potential developmental delays, disorders, or atypical patterns early on, allowing for timely interventions and support. By systematically examining various aspects of neurodevelopment, clinicians and specialists can tailor interventions to address specific needs, enhance learning experiences, and foster optimal growth. 

The importance of neurodevelopmental disorder assessments extends beyond diagnosis, influencing educational planning, therapeutic interventions, and family support. Early identification of developmental challenges empowers caregivers, educators, and healthcare professionals to collaborate in providing targeted interventions, ultimately maximising the individual’s potential and improving their overall quality of life. The comprehensive insights gained through neurodevelopmental assessments contribute significantly to a more informed and holistic approach to developmental well-being.

Obsessive

Complusive 

Disorder 

Assessment

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental health condition characterised by two main components: obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are intrusive, unwanted thoughts, images, or urges that cause significant distress or anxiety. Compulsions are repetitive behaviors or mental acts that individuals feel driven to perform in response to their obsessions. These compulsions are often carried out in an attempt to reduce the distress caused by the obsessions or to prevent a feared event or situation. However, the compulsions provide only temporary relief and can significantly interfere with daily functioning. OCD can vary in severity, ranging from mild to severe, and it can have a profound impact on various aspects of life, including work, relationships, and overall well-being. Treatment typically involves a combination of therapy, medication, and support to help individuals manage symptoms and improve their quality of life.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) assessment involves a thorough evaluation of individuals who experience intrusive, unwanted thoughts (obsessions) and engage in repetitive behaviors or mental acts (compulsions) to alleviate distress or prevent perceived harm. This assessment aims to diagnose OCD and assess the severity of symptoms, as well as any associated impairment in functioning. Common assessment tools for OCD include structured clinical interviews such as the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), which quantifies the severity of obsessions and compulsions, and self-report measures like the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (OCI-R), which assesses the frequency and distress associated with OCD symptoms. Through systematic assessment using these tools, clinicians can accurately diagnose OCD, tailor treatment plans, and monitor progress, ultimately promoting effective management and improved quality of life for individuals affected by this disorder.

Post 

Traumatic 

Stress 

Disorder  

Assessment

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) assessment involves evaluating individuals who have experienced traumatic events and are exhibiting symptoms such as re-experiencing, avoidance, negative alterations in mood and cognition, and hyper-arousal. Various assessment tools are employed to gauge the presence and severity of these symptoms. Commonly used instruments include the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), which involves a structured interview to assess symptomatology, the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5), a self-report questionnaire to measure PTSD symptoms, and the Impact of Event Scale (IES-R), which assesses the impact of specific traumatic events. By utilising these assessment tools, our clinicians can accurately diagnose PTSD, monitor treatment progress, and tailor interventions to address the individual’s specific needs, ultimately promoting recovery and improved quality of life.

Sensory 

Processing  

Disorder  

Assessment

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) encompasses a spectrum of conditions affecting how the nervous system processes sensory information. Individuals may exhibit heightened or diminished responses to stimuli, leading to challenges in regulating reactions to everyday sensory experiences. SPD manifests diversely, from sensory sensitivities to seeking or avoiding behaviors, with varying severity. Eight types and 16 subtypes categorise SPD, including sensory awareness, sensorimotor skills, self-regulation, sensory communication, coping, social skills, environmental adaptability, and advocacy. Assessing SPD involves evaluating sensory processing across these domains to tailor interventions promoting effective sensory integration and functional independence.

Speech &

Language 

Disorder  

Assessment

Speech and Language Disorders (SLD) encompass a range of difficulties affecting communication, including speech production, language comprehension and expression, social communication, and pragmatics. These disorders can manifest across different age groups, from infancy through adulthood, and may be caused by various factors, including genetic predisposition, neurological conditions, developmental delays, environmental influences, or trauma. Speech Sound Disorders (SSD) involves difficulty producing speech sounds correctly or fluently. It includes articulation disorders (difficulty pronouncing specific sounds), phonological disorders (difficulty organising speech sounds into patterns), and fluency disorders (such as stuttering or cluttering). Language disorders involve difficulties with understanding and/or using spoken or written language.

Assessment of speech and language disorders typically involves a comprehensive evaluation by speech-language pathologists, including standardised tests, observation, interviews, and informal assessments. 

Social

 Communication

 Disorder 

Assessment

Social communication disorders (SCD) refer to difficulties in using verbal and non-verbal communication for social purposes. People with SCD may struggle with understanding and using language appropriately in social contexts, leading to challenges in forming and maintaining relationships. This can include difficulties with conversational skills, understanding social cues, and adapting communication to different social situations.

Assessment tools for SCD typically include standardised questionnaires, such as the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) and the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), which are administered by our educational therapists to gather information about an individual’s communication patterns, social behavior, and interaction difficulties. Through the systematic use of these assessment tools, our clinicians can effectively identify potential indicators of SCD, allowing for timely intervention and support tailored to the individual’s needs. By addressing SCD early on, individuals can receive appropriate interventions to enhance their social communication skills and improve their overall quality of life.

Case 

Evaluation 

Profiling

Our case evaluation (or evaluation of client’s treatment progress) methodology utilises both quantitative and qualitative processes to systematically process collected and analysed information data in order to evaluate the case of our client before providing a judgment on the client’s level of achievement based on his/her assessed abilities. Mathematically speaking, case evaluation may be expressed as Quantitative Description of Client’s Attainment of the Target Objectives (ATT) + Qualitative Description of Client’s Abilities (ABI) + Value Judgement about Client’s Attainment (ATT) and Abilities (ABI)

This information set up the profile of your child and helps your family members, educators and organisations interacting with him/ her to develop a deeper understanding of who your child is as a learner in terms of strength and challenges, talents, aspirations, and understanding of what interest and motivates them when learning. Your child’s profile also helps educators or teachers to develop inclusive classroom learning programs and effective relationships with him or her.